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Hazardous Plants For Pets–These Plants Can Be Toxic

Hazardous Plants For Pets–These Plants Can Be Toxic

I have compiled a list of 57 hazardous plants for pets–Dogs, Cats, Ferrets…

Some of these plants can be toxic.

Some of these hazardous plants are indoor plants, others are outdoor plants. Many can grow indoors or out. Some of these plants are more harmful than others, and some can be toxic. Plants, such as Poinsettias and Firesticks secrete a liquid that can be toxic. Other plants, such as Philodendron and Devil’s Ivy, if eaten, can cause swelling and burning of the mouth and tongue as well as digestive issues, spasms, and even seizures. While some parts of these plants are often more hazardous than others, every part of some plants are toxic. With the Sago Palm, for example, every single part of the plant is poisonous—including the seeds, roots and leaves. Eating any part of the plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and in some cases, liver failure.

Note that many of these plants may come in different varieties and/or colors. The flower and leaf colors may vary, as well as the berries or fruit of the plant. The shape of the flower and leaves may also vary. The names and photos are representative of 57 plants that are hazardous to pets. I have included photos of most plants on the list, with the exception of a few very common, well know plants, such as tulips.

These plants may be beautiful and we may love to have our homes and yards filled with them. However, if your dog, cat, ferret or other pet has access to them, there is always a risk. It is best to keep any of the plants on this list away from pets. Keep them out of your house and out of your garden. It is always better to be safe now rather than to be sorry later.

 

Aloe Vera (Aloe Barbadensis, Aloe Indica, Aloe Barbados)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Aloe Vera

Amaryllis

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Amaryllis

Asparagas Fern
Autumn Crocus

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Autumn Crocus

Azalea (Rhododendron)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Azalea

Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia)
Blue Bells (Browallia)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Blue Bells

Boxwood (Buxus)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Boxwood

Burro’s Tail (Sedum morganianum)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Burros Tail

Bush Lily, Natal Lily (Clivia)

Hazardous Plants for Pet
Bush Lily

Calla Lily (Zantedeschia)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Calla Lily

Castor Bean (Ricinus communis)

Hazardous Plants for Pet
Castor Bean

Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema commutatum)

Hazardous Plants For Pets
Chinese Evergreen

Corn Plant (Dracaena fragrans)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Corn Plant

Croton (Codiaeum)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Croton

Cyclamen

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Cyclamen

Daffodils (Narcissus)
Devil’s Ivy, Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Devils Ivy

Dumb Cane (Dieffenbachia)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Dumb Cane

Elephant Ear (Caladium)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Elephant Ear

English Ivy (Hedera helix)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
English Ivy

Eucalyptus

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Eucalyptus

Firesticks (Euphorbia)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Firesticks

Firethorn (Pyracantha)

Hazardous Plants for Pet
Firethorn

Flamingo Flower (Anthurium scherzeranum)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Flamingo Flower

Floss Flower (Ageratum)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Floss Flower

Golden Trumpet (Allamanda)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Golden Trumpet

Heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens)

Hazardous Plants for Pet
Heliotrope

Holly (Ilex aquifolium)
Honeysuckle (Lonicera)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Honeysuckle

Hyacinth
Hydrangea
Iris
Jade (Crassula ovata)
Japanese Laurel (aucuba)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Japanese Laurel

Jasmine

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Jasmine

Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Jerusalem Cherry

Lantana

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Lantana

Lily of the Valley (Convallaria)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Lily of the Valley

Mistletoe (Phoradendron serotinum)
Natal Palm (Carissa macrocarpa)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Natal Palm

Oleander (Nerium oleander)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Oleander

Ornamental Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Ornamental Pepper

Petunia
Philodendron

Hazardous Plants for Pet
Philodendron

Poinsettia (Euphorbia)
Primrose (Primula)

Hazardous Plants For Pets
Primrose

Red Hot Cat’s Tail, Chenille Plant (Acalypha)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Red Hot Cats Tail

Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Sago Palm

Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum)
String of Pearls (Senecio)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
String of Pearls

Sweet Pea (Lathyrus)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Sweet Pea

Swiss Cheese Plant (Monstera)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Swiss Cheese Plant

Tulip (Tulipa)
Wax Begonia (Begonia x semerflorens-cultorium)

Hazardous Plants for Pets
Begonia

Wax Plant (Hoya)

Hazardous Plants for Pet
Wax Plant

Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, Kiss-Me-Quick, Lady-of-the-Night (Brunfelsia)

Hazardous Plants for Pet
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow

ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia )

Hazardous plants for pets-zz
ZZ Plant


I want to stress that this is a partial list of 57 common hazardous plants to dogs, cats, ferrets and other pets. There are hundreds of plants that can be hazardous to pets–too many to list here. If you want to learn more, check out these resources.

If your pet comes in contact with one of these plants, especially if he has ingested some of the plant, please contact your Vet or call the ASPCA’s poison control hotline at (888) 426-4435. There may be a charge from the ASPCA for their service.

Your comments are welcome.

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10 thoughts on “Hazardous Plants For Pets–These Plants Can Be Toxic

  1. Hello,
    I would like to thank you for your very informative post on hazardous plants for pets.
    It is true, we don’t think of plants when something is not right with our pets.
    Good to know and to be able to see if my interior plants could be a threat.
    I thought animals were eating instinctively plants that help them to detox? could they chew on any plants?
    Thank you so much.
    Good luck
    Psunshine

    1. Hi Psunshine,
      I’m glad you found my post informative. Some animals do eat grass, for instance, if they have an upset stomach. But some pets just eat everything and anything!

  2. I was surprised that Aloe Vera is hazardous to pets, it is a very common plant where I live and many people use it for different thinks, for skin and some make a juice from it. It´s good to know that I have to keep it away from my back yard because I have a dog.
    Very good info.

    1. Thanks for your comment, Ruben!
      Yes, Aloe Vera is used in different forms for people. I put it on sunburns. I have a plant, but it is not where pets can get to it!

  3. Hi, Sandra!

    Thanks for the poston hazardous plants for pets! I never thought that Aloe Vera might be toxic for my pet. I will make sure from now on to keep it away from it. Thanks for raising awareness. Keep up with the good work!

    1. I’m glad you found it useful, Andrei!
      I was surprised about Aloe Vera as well. People drink Aloe juice!

  4. Wow. So many hazardous plants for pets; maybe silk plants are the way to go indoors if you have pets!

    1. Hi Bryce
      Yes there are a lot of hazardous plants for pets! Silk is a good alternative!

  5. I am really surprised that so many plants would be toxic for pets. Yes, I know about oleander. When I had sheep they perfectly knew that it is poisonous and didn’t eat it. It is growing here everywhere and I have never seen my cats or dogs taking any interest in it – except lying under the bushes in the shade. The type of Aloe I grow in a pot has many thorns and that would certainly hinder my dog or cats to try to eat them. Not sure about the other plants you mention but I certainly will observe it in future. Thank you

    1. Hi Heidi,
      Thanks for your comment. There are so many plants that are hazardous for pets and many are toxic. Most pet owners are not aware of even the most common ones. I know I wasn’t until I started doing research. Sometimes animals instinctively know to avoid certain plants, but not always. And sometimes, especially with ferrets, they are just too curious!

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