Posted on

Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil–Good For Ferrets?

wild alaskan salmon oil--Good For Ferrets?Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil–Good For Ferrets?

Salmon in general is an excellent source of vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium and a good source of niacin, omega-3 fatty acids, protein, phosphorus and vitamin B6. It is also a good source of choline, pantothenic acid, biotin and potassium.

When used in moderation and sourced from reputable brands, salmon oil is a beneficial addition to a ferret’s balanced diet. Not only is it good for a ferrets’ skin and coat–helping with dry skin, itching and adding shine– but it is also beneficial for their heart, eyes and joint health.

Salmon oil is a great treat that can be used for distracting your ferret when clipping nails or cleaning ears.

The benefits of salmon oil has influenced many pet owners, including ferret parents, to incorporate salmon oil into their fur babies’ diets. Overall, supplementing with salmon oil is good for pet health; however, too much of a good thing may have adverse effects. Continue reading Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil–Good For Ferrets?

Posted on

How To Trim Ferrets Nails – Step By Step Guide

How To Trim Ferrets Nails - Step By Step GuideHow To Trim Ferrets Nails – Step By Step Guide

I have been often asked how I keep my ferret’s nails so neatly cut and trimmed. 

Many ferret parents leave it to the Vet to take care of this grooming necessity. However, it’s not that difficult if you know a few tricks.

Ferrets cannot  keep their  nails at the proper length on their own. They don’t get worn down much naturally and grow quickly. If left untrimmed too long, a ferret’s nails will start to curl and grow under her paw and even into it.

When your ferret’s nails are too long, they can have tears, sharp points and ragged edges. She can easily catch them on bedding, furniture or carpets. This could break the nail, tear it, or rip it off completely. Your ferret could further injure herself from trying to free her paw.

I know of a ferret mom who found one of her ferrets dangling from her cage hammock by one nail! She caught her nail in the fabric when she tried to get out of the hammock. I can’t imagine how how much that must have hurt. She was lucky no permanent damage was done. Continue reading How To Trim Ferrets Nails – Step By Step Guide

Posted on

How to Clean Ferrets Ears Safely

How to Clean Ferret's Ears

How to Clean Ferret’s Ears Safely

Cleaning your ferret’s ears should be a regular part of caring for your ferret. To keep your ferret healthy, it is important to make sure her ears are free of debris and discharge.

A ferret’s ear wax should be red, brown, or gold colored. If you notice very dark brown or black debris or discharge, be sure to take your ferret to your Vet. Your ferret may have an ear infection or ear mites. Left untreated, these conditions can turn into severe health problems for your ferret. Continue reading How to Clean Ferrets Ears Safely

Posted on

Hazardous Plants For Pets–These Plants Can Be Toxic

Hazardous Plants For Pets–These Plants Can Be Toxic

I have compiled a list of 57 hazardous plants for pets–Dogs, Cats, Ferrets…

Some of these plants can be toxic.

Some of these hazardous plants are indoor plants, others are outdoor plants. Many can grow indoors or out. Some of these plants are more harmful than others, and some can be toxic. Plants, such as Poinsettias and Firesticks secrete a liquid that can be toxic. Other plants, such as Philodendron and Devil’s Ivy, if eaten, can cause swelling and burning of the mouth and tongue as well as digestive issues, spasms, and even seizures. While some parts of these plants are often more hazardous than others, every part of some plants are toxic. With the Sago Palm, for example, every single part of the plant is poisonous—including the seeds, roots and leaves. Eating any part of the plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and in some cases, liver failure. Continue reading Hazardous Plants For Pets–These Plants Can Be Toxic

Posted on

Why is My Ferret Losing Hair? Causes and Treatments

why is my ferret losing hairWhy is My Ferret Losing Hair?

Causes and Treatments

 

Ferret Alopecia

Alopecia is the complete or partial loss of hair in areas where it normally grows. This is a common disorder in ferrets.  Ferrets between the ages of 3 and 7, and ferrets that are neutered or spayed are most prone to hair loss.

There are many possible causes and treatments of hair loss in ferrets. It is best to take your ferret to a vet experienced with ferrets when you first notice your ferret’s hair loss. The earlier the cause is diagnosed, the sooner the treatment can begin and help prevent the condition from getting worse. Continue reading Why is My Ferret Losing Hair? Causes and Treatments

Posted on

Ear Mites and Ferrets–Diagnosis and Treatment

Ear mites and FerretsEar Mites and Ferrets–Diagnosis and Treatment

Unfortunately, ear mite infestation is very common in ferrets. It is also common in cats and dogs.

Otodectes cynotis, or ear mites, live their lives inside an animal’s ears. Otodectes cynotis is contagious and spread by direct contact among ferrets, cats, dogs and other animals.  Many kits already have ear mites before they are brought home. Because of the highly contagious nature of ear mites, if you have more than one ferret, or have other pets, all pets in your home need to be treated.  Even those pets who do not show obvious signs of ear mite infestation need to be treated, because the treated pet may be reinfected immediately after the end of treatment by those pets who were not treated.

Otodectes cynotis is often unnoticed in ferrets.

One reason is that the mites are very tiny and can only be seen under a microscope. Another reason is that ferrets rarely show signs of being infected with ear mites. Ear mites in cats and dogs can often be suspected due to ear scratching and head shaking when they have an ear mite infestation.  Ferrets rarely show these signs. A third reason is that, although a thick, reddish brown to black, waxy discharge is commonly observed in ferrets suffering from ear mite infestation, it is also normal for ferrets to have a brown ear wax.  Therefore, a diagnosis of ear mite infestation cannot be made by merely observing the color of a ferret’s ear wax. The diagnosis must be made by a veterinarian. Continue reading Ear Mites and Ferrets–Diagnosis and Treatment

Posted on

How to Bathe a Ferret–Important Steps

How to Bathe a Ferret–Important Steps 

When to bathe your ferrethow to bathe a ferret

Before we get into how to bathe a ferret, it is important to know when to bathe a ferret.

Many ferret owners love their pets but get frustrated by their smell, which can be quite strong. Bathing ferrets can be a good way to combat odor. Ferrets should not be bathed more than once every 3 months. Bathing a ferret too often can actually make the smell worse. Bathing strips oils from a ferret’s skin and oil glands go into overdrive to replace it. This result in even more odor! Ferrets can become itchy and uncomfortable when bathed too often, as well. If your ferret is scratching frequently, you might want to cut back on how often you’re bathing her.

Ferret smells are actually more often related to a ferret’s bedding, cage, and blankets than to the ferret himself. Try washing these items before bathing your ferret to rule them out as the primary cause of odor. For more info on ferret odor, see this article.

How to Bathe a Ferret–Important Steps

Before starting the bathing process, you may find it helpful to get her used to water first. If your ferret doesn’t like water, first let her play in the sink or tub without water, so she gets used to being in the place where she will be bathed. When she seems to feel comfortable in the tube or sink, turn the faucet on just a little bit and let her explore the water. Give her licks of Ferretone, or another healthy treat as you gradually get her wet. Many ferrets love to play in the water, and some even like to swim! Continue reading How to Bathe a Ferret–Important Steps

Posted on

National Ferret Day–April 2

 

ferretlover.com

Get ready for National Ferret Day!

National Ferret Day is April 2nd in the U.S.

Celebrate ferrets and ferret lovers!

National Ferret Day is the perfect opportunity to spoil your ferret and/or to give a gift or send a card to the ferret lover or ferret parent!

Check out some of the unique ferret themed merchandise in my store-ferret backpacks, ferret jewelry, ferret lawn statues statues…

How are you going to celebrate?

 

Posted on

What Not to Feed a Ferret–Ferret Food Can Harm Your Ferret

what not to feed a ferretWhat Not to Feed a Ferret

Ferret Food Can Harm Your Ferret

For some reason, as ferret parents, and pet parents in general, we often take pet food for granted. We assume that if something  is sold as ferret food, it must be healthy for ferrets.

We know that not all human food is good for us, even though it is sold as “food”.  We have learned that many types of foods can, and often do, cause serious heath problems. Some of these unhealthy “food” items are easy to recognize, such as potato chips, soda, candy… but some foods and ingredients are not so obvious. Canned and packaged foods, for example, are often loaded with sugar, salt, fat and chemicals.

So what about pet foods? If we know that human food manufactures do not always have our health in mind, how can we assume that pet food manufactures have our pets’ health in mind? We can’t and we shouldn’t. Continue reading What Not to Feed a Ferret–Ferret Food Can Harm Your Ferret

Posted on

Ferret In Cage Ferret Out of Cage–How Much Time Should a Ferret Spend In and Out of Cage?

How Much Time Should a Ferret Spend In and Out of CageFerret In Cage Ferret Out of Cage–How Much Time Should a Ferret Spend In and Out of Cage?

Ferrets have a knack for making you feel guilty when you put them in their cage. One of my ferrets, Toby, was always trying to” break out”. He would climb up to the top door, grab the bars in his paws and push and shake the door, trying to open it.

However, for their protection, ferrets should be kept in a ferret cage, enclosure, ferret-proof room or area when not being supervised.

A ferret’s cage not only acts as his home–a place he should feel comfortable in–it is also a place to keep him safe. There are endless  dangers around your home–wires, appliances, cleaning supplies, etc.– it’s simply not safe to permit your ferret to roam free without supervision. Even if you think you have ferret-proofed your home, there is no limit to what a ferret can find to get into. Continue reading Ferret In Cage Ferret Out of Cage–How Much Time Should a Ferret Spend In and Out of Cage?